PostgreSQL Insert for an ObjectRocket Instance

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Introduction

The ObjectRocket platform is the futuristic-minded developer’s choice for managing business applications today and in the years to come. One main feature of the platform is its ability to make table management limitations a thing of the past. For example, technical specialists need to organize PostgreSQL data this and that way. And often, the tasks of inserting records is a daily routine. Whether you need to add a single record or multiples, the PostgreSQL insert ObjectRocket statement is a simple operation you’ll want to use on a regular basis. Learn how with this tutorial. Use the INSERT statement of PostgreSQL for your ObjectRocket instances all of the time.

Prerequisites

Download, install, and configure the latest versions of the following:

  • PostgreSQL – Version 11 or higher.

  • Log in to your ObjectRocket account, and from the Mission Control dashboard and create a Postgres instance.

Connecting Local Psql Utility to ObjectRocket Postgres Instance

Make an ObjectRocket Postgres connection for your instance with the psql local utility for PostgresSQL’s front-end.

After you complete the psql utility launch, follow the prompts and fill in the required information for your instance of ObjectRocket Postgres.

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Server [localhost]: ingress.w98sujpz.launchpad.objectrocket.cloud

DATABASE [PostgreSQL]:

Port [5432]: 4149

Username [PostgreSQL]: pguser

Password FOR USER orkb:

An alternative way to make the connection is through the psql interactive terminal, like this:

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psql -h ingress.w98sujpz.launchpad.objectrocket.cloud -U pguser -d PostgreSQL -p 4149

Now, use your password to log in:

Screenshot

PostgreSQL INSERT Statement

Add to a table a value set or a single value. Use the statement INSERT to do the PostgreSQL insert ObjectRocket operation.

In your INSERT syntax, after table name you put the columns or column list you want to add:

(col1, col2, col3, col4, col5, col6, col7,…colN)

  • Add the values or a set of values:

(val1, val2, val3, val4, val5, val6, val7,…valN)

Here is an example of a syntax utilizing the INSERT statement:

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INSERT INTO TABLE_NAME (COLUMN OR column_list)
VALUES (value_1 OR set_of_values)

Let’s break down the syntax you used into a more detailed explanation:

  • Begin with the clause INSERT INTO.

  • Input your table’s name.

  • Add the column names that have the values you want to insert.

  • Input the values or value set

PostgreSQL Table Structure Example

Create a structured table for practicing the PostgreSQL insert ObjectRocket statement. Within the table, you’ll specify the values and data types.

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CREATE TABLE kids_name (
    id INT PRIMARY KEY,
    name VARCHAR
);

Add the details to the table. Here’s an example of a table all filled out with data you can use for your INSERT statement.

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                  Table "public.kids_name"
 Column |       Type        | Collation | Nullable | Default
--------+-------------------+-----------+----------+---------
 id     | integer           |           | not null |
 name   | character varying |           |          |
Indexes:
    "kids_name_pkey" PRIMARY KEY, btree (id)

PostgreSQL INSERT INTO Table With Single Value Example

Try making a one record insert into the table you created earlier.

Use the INSERT statement like this:

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INSERT INTO kids_name (id, name)
VALUES (1, 'raizel');

You should see a response something similar to this:

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sandbox=> SELECT * FROM kids_name;
 id |  name
----+--------
  1 | raizel
(1 ROW)

PostgreSQL INSERT INTO Table With Multiple Values Example

You can also perform a multiple-record insert right into your table for PostgreSQL insert ObjectRocket instance.

Use the INSERT statement like this to add several records:

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INSERT INTO kids_name (id, name)
VALUES
(1, 'yeshua'),
(2, 'abishai'),
(3, 'abiel'),
(4, 'dj'),
(5, 'ann');

Here are some important things to remember about the INSERT operation you just completed.

  • Each value must be separated by a comma.

  • Immediately after the statement, look for a response that indicates the total of inserted records. In the example, five records were inserted. Therefore, you should receive an INSERT 0,5 notification which indicates successful completion of the five records you wanted to add to your table.

Confirm it with the statement SELECT like this:

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sandbox=> SELECT * FROM kids_name;
 id |  name
----+---------
  1 | yeshua
  2 | abishai
  3 | abiel
  4 | dj
  5 | ann
(5 ROWS)

Conclusion

PostgreSQL insert ObjectRocket increases productivity because, with the INSERT statement, you can modify table data in a straightforward way. What’s more, you end up using the least bit of code to get it done. Afterward, you can verify the success of your operation with the SELECT statement. Doing this decreases the chance for errors. If the number of records you intended to add doesn’t match the number shown in results from the statement SELECT, you can make any necessary additions with another INSERT statement. For those professionals like yoursel who manage data all of the time, streamlining the process is always a good thing.

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